THE MEADOW…YET AGAIN

                                                                                      The meadow is once more looksing like an impressionist painting. Swaths of blue native phlox (Phlox divericata) make their way between the daffodil foliage and the ‘Wake Robin’  ( Trillium cuneatum) .

                                                                                       

                                                          

                                                                   

The trees are now playing an important role, so the focus changes.

                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                                              

This is The Meadow viewed from the driveway on west side of the house looking east. (Above) 

                                                                                   

Soon the weeds & wild grasses will cover this all and it will look wild & wonderful. Then the hum of beneficial insects, bees and butterflies will fill the air. After the plants set their seed it will get the annual cut. This meadow gives me 12 months of joy!!

© all photos 2011

Note: WordPress noted that I published a draft & not the updated version of this post AFTER it was posted…why not BEFORE???

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THE MEADOW CONTINUES….

The meadow continues to delight. The last of the daffodils…

                                                                                   

 are joined by  Woodland Phlox (Phlox divericata) and  Trilliums (Trillium cuneatum).

                                                                                        

Unfortunately the colours do not photograph well, the Trillium are a beautiful shade of claret, which is very effective with the blue Phlox.

                                                                                          

                                               

Every one has different markings ………amazing!!

© all photos 2011

WILD THINGS

Time for the WILD THINGS! 

                                                                                                 

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) popping up in the meadow. The name is derived from the red sap which bleeds as the stem is cut or the root disturbed. The Indians used this sap for paint and as a dye.

                                                                                  

 Trillium cuneatum naturalized in the meadow. I cannot take credit for this…they were here before me and keep multiplying.

                                                                                            

Woodland phlox (Phlox divericata) naturalized with the Trillium….delicate & fragrant.

I encourage all these to increase by allowing their seed to ripen and disperse before the meadow is cut. Slowly & surely this is happening. Every year at this time I wonder if I will live long enough to see my vision come to fruition. But then again its about the journey, and I am enjoying this one immensely.

© All photos & text 2011

THE MEADOW

The Meadow is located where the walk from the Circle of  Friends terminates on the south side. When I first saw this area I knew this would be where I could try “The English Thing’ with naturalized bulbs.

                                                                   

Since the foliage of the bulbs must be allowed to mature and the wildflowers must be allowed to ripen their seed, no mowing is allowed. Voila… a MEADOW! 

                                                                      

Totally delightful, easily sustainable, pollinator friendly …. a gift for living away from the city. I wish you could smell it after it gets it annual haircut.

Daffodils (Narcissus) in early spring followed by Woodland Phlox (Phlox divaricata) and Trilliums (Trillium cuneatum), and NOW  Spider lilies (lycoris radiata)!! 

                                                                        

© All photos & text 2010