CAMELLIAS! CAMELLIAS!

Blooming now

                                                                          

Camellia sasanqua ‘Maiden’s Blush’  above

                                                                   

Camellia sasanqua ‘Jean May’ above & below

                                                                       

                                                                   

Camellia sasanqua “Daydream’

                                                                   

Below, one of the Ackerman Hybrids,  C. ‘Winter’s Charm’

                                                                    

                                                                      

Does this look familiar? I posted on this area in spring when the Azaleas were blooming. This is the walk to the compost.

Dr. William Ackerman  of the National Arboretum crossed Camellia oleifera & Camellia hiemalis or C. sasanqua  to produce a plant hardy to 10F. If you live in colder climes…the Ackerman Hybrids are for you.

It has been said that the trinity of Southern Gardens are azaleas, hydrangeas & camellias. The latter two giving the longest show. These Camellias will bloom a full 6 weeks.  THAT, is a show!

                                                                

The above beauty never had a nametag. AND speaking of a long show…

                                                                      

Some hydrangeas are still stunning.

On a personal note, the last weeks have been very difficult.  I will try to post more often in the future.

© All photos & text 2010

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RANDOM THOUGHTS

                                                                     

 Evergreen ferns keep the garden looking lush in winter.

                                                                     

Here the Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora)  adds texture to the camellia walk, (above & below)

                                                                   

so does the Arborvitae or Moss Fern (Selaginella pallescens) (below)

                                                                    

 and the Tassel Fern. (Polystichum polyblepharum)

                                                 

Seating,  painted matt black, does not detract from the real interest..STRUCTURE & PLANTS!

                                                                  

 This is after all, a garden. ( I am all for a touch of whimsy… just not here.)

The individual differences in seedlings will always amaze me. Below, Toad Lilies (Tricyrtis hirta) that seeded themselves.

 

Finally… why I do not want curtains.

                                                                      

                                                          ( Mom, this is for you)            

 

STRUCTURE IN THE GARDEN

                                                                   

With their rich evergreen foliage camellias are used in my garden to create the ‘ architecture’. They form the ‘walls’ in my shade garden which give it structure.

                                                                   

My walls talk.

  © all photos & text 2010

THE CAMELLIA WALK

When I was planning my southern garden, I knew I had to have a Camellia Walk.

                                                                    

 Many years ago, when I lived in Massachusetts, I would regularly  visit the Lyman Estates. It was there that I saw my first Camellias. A visit to Mr Lyman’s greenhouses in February was an incredible sight. There were greenhouses where  grapes were ripening during winter, fragrant Jasmines & Daphne. One greenhouse was devoted to Camellias and they formed a spectacular avenue.   It was a southern garden in a series of greenhouses.

I know that this was where the seed for our move south was sown. I wanted to garden & live where it was possible to have Camellias bloom in the winter. I am by the way Canadian, a native Montrealer, so I am no stranger to long, grey, dreary winters. Below, my antidote…

                                                                       

  the entrance to The Camellia Walk …AKA …The Winter Garden.

                                                                       

 Truly Southern with its  swept dirt, curved path; it leads from the back of the house to the compost & (former) chicken house.

Underplanted  primarily with evergreen ferns & Lenten Roses  (Helleborus orientalis), it never looks bare even in the dead of winter. In fact, that is when it comes to life!

                                                                  

Stay tuned for more!

© All photos & text 2010

GOLDEN DAYS

Another perfect day in the garden. I love the quality of  light at this time of year. Look at the shadows in the meadow.

                                                                  

The air is scented with the fragrance of the Tea Olive ( Osmanthus fragrans) and the perfume of Elaeagnus.  Both huge fragrances from the tiniest of flowers.

                                                                   

More projects made their way onto the’ To Do’ list… below a project

                                                                         

abandoned in spring, waiting to be completed.

(The Putti, above, has been with me my entire gardening life.)

                                                                      

 There is a  brick pattern I would like to replicate for this area which is an entrance to the cutting garden. All these projects must fit into the maintenance schedule. That sounds like I am organised…I am not. My gardening is usually emergency management, although I do go out with a plan.

                                                                   

Look at this cluster of berries!! No wonder the birds are building nests in all the shrubs.

                                                                   

 Good food source, although it will take several frosts before these berries are palatable for our feathered friends.

                                                                 

AND, Clematis texensis ‘Catherine Clanwilliam’ gets the Energizer Bunny Award. She is still blooming.

© All photos & text 2010

THE MEADOW

The Meadow is located where the walk from the Circle of  Friends terminates on the south side. When I first saw this area I knew this would be where I could try “The English Thing’ with naturalized bulbs.

                                                                   

Since the foliage of the bulbs must be allowed to mature and the wildflowers must be allowed to ripen their seed, no mowing is allowed. Voila… a MEADOW! 

                                                                      

Totally delightful, easily sustainable, pollinator friendly …. a gift for living away from the city. I wish you could smell it after it gets it annual haircut.

Daffodils (Narcissus) in early spring followed by Woodland Phlox (Phlox divaricata) and Trilliums (Trillium cuneatum), and NOW  Spider lilies (lycoris radiata)!! 

                                                                        

© All photos & text 2010