BACK IN THE GARDEN

Finally!

Well, I’m back in the garden and dancing as fast as I can .  There is no end to the debris…..

                                                                                                      S,

 Screaming to be pruned are the  ‘ Annabelle’ and paniculata type hydrangeas*,  roses, grapes… the list goes on… plus the hellebores need to be deadhead. (who am I kidding? the hellebores will not get done) This list is for the ornamental garden; right  now the preparation of the beds for vegtables is proirity. This week end we turned the beds  in the potager.

                                                                                      

                                                                               

My friend Julieta of the incredible blog LINDARAXAS GARDEN is buildng a potager.  She will be posting recipes created with the bounty of her garden; and I can’t wait! If you appreciate good food and  have not yet discovered her blog,  you are in for a treat.

So here is a brief outline on how to prepare your soil.

Idealy beds  should be  4′ wide, so one can reach into them (from each side) without the need to step-in,  as this compacts the soil.  Paths between beds should be 18-24″; wide enough to accomadate a wheelbarrow.

                                                                                       

Turning the soil is simply,  a shovel inserted fully into the ground and the soil removed is flipped over. To this  add a good thick (6″) layer of compost, manure & chopped/shredded leaves. (run over a pile of leaves with a lawn mower a few times.) and chop  into this soil, or use a tiller to incorporate. Add another layer of compost etc. and again ‘turn’ this into the soil. This brings  the amendments to where the plant roots will feed.  Water well and let those soil enzymes go to work for a few weeks before planting. NOW  is the time. (the above beds are not yet amended)

 Lacking these amendments; I have had very good luck with  NATURES HELPER and composted cow manure from DIY stores. The best brand is BLACK KOW,it comes in a yellow bag. Avoid the .99 cent variety as it is mostly pine bark and less than 1% manure. If you are fortunate to have a good nursery close by, they should stock soil amendments, buying in bulk is cheaper and it will be delivered.( the bags weigh 20 to 40 lbs.)

                                                                                           In Georgia, lettuce is a cool weather annual, so one grows it in the winter. This year they are maturing very quickly, due to the warm weather, Lots of salad on the menu!

 

**Hydrangeas DO NOT PRUNE THE BIG BLUE MOPHEADS!

                                                                                      

 

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GARDEN UPDATE CONTINUED

                                                                      

Plants with a cascading habit,  call attention to the ground plane.  Above, The heavy flowers of  Snowflake Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’),  draw the eye to the  Japanese painted fern (Athyrium nipponicum).

                                                                     

 The flower on ‘Snowflake’  has  double sepals, significantly different from that                                                                    of ‘Amethyst’ above, or ‘Alice’ below.

                                                                      

                                                               

Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’   forming it’s  flower heads. This is one hydrangea that SHOULD BE PRUNED early spring. These hydrangeas form flower buds on NEW GROWTH.

UPDATE ON EPHEMERALS:

                                                                   

The Trillium are fading, (see yellow foliage). What will clothe the ground now is Vinca. I really tried for Selaginella kraussiana aurea, below

                                                                    

 but it prefers the path so I’m going to stop fighting and let the vinca do its thing.

                                                                   

Arum foliage has died down & the berries have formed. They need to ripen, then they will be spread where more are needed. See previous post on Arum.

FINALLY THE POTAGER:

 Below squash, peppers, cucumbers, beans, Eggplant                                                                  

  and below, TOMATOES!!                                                                

 Have a great week end!

©All photos and text 2010