GARDEN TOUR 2

P1240776

One of the joys of the Garden Tour Season I always look forward to, is the tour put on by Georgia Perennial Plant Association. Several chosen gardens are opened to the membership for one week- end a year. Most gardeners would have bottled water and iced tea available for the visitors. Margaret Moseley would serve her famous Almond Tea whenever her garden was opened. Last week Pimento Cheese party sandwiches were passed around on silver trays for the guests! (Did I forget to mention that in the last post?)

For several years I served as the Tour Chairperson of this organization as well as The American Hydrangea Society. I know firsthand about what it takes to create a successful event. So I was not surprised that in recent years the format has changed and only one garden is opened for a day. I like this change. One no longer has to budget their time and rush to see as many gardens as possible in the allotted timeframe. These are SPECTACULAR gardens where one could happily spend the entire day and still not take it all in.

P1240773

This year, the garden of Lyndy Broder was the featured garden. Lyndy is a dear friend and an expert on the genus Clematis. Her knowledge and talents however, go far beyond Clematis.  She has collected an amazing variety of unusual and seldom seen trees and shrubs to create a personal arboretum ‘par excellence’ on her property….and almost all are festooned with the most delicious varieties of Clematis one could imagine.

P1240753                                                                       A wall of  seed grown species welcome visitors

P1240757

P1240762

P1240760

P1240771                                                                            Golden Larch (Pseudolarix  amabilis) with Clematis

P1240782

The Canadian Geese Meadow leading to the lake above.

P1240786

 

P1240768                                            The Sanctuary of St. Fiacre, patron saint of gardeners ( loved working with Lyndy on this project)

P1240779

P1240804

When a garden of this caliber is open….. everyone comes. This turned into a reunion of great plantsmen and gardeners,  a huge amount of talent here, the energy was palpable.

Advertisements

WOW! ASAO!!! or THE FIRST CLEMATIS

First clematis to bloom in my garden. Clematis ‘Asao’

                                                                                               

My friend Lyndy Broder is going to show me how to take cuttings of Clematis. This is a good thing; these babies are expensive and there are hundreds out there I want. (Plant Greed raises its ugly head!) Most of the plants I want LIVE in Lyndy’s garden!!  How fortuitous that she is as generous as she is knowledgeable.

I planted over 65 Clematis in my garden, however, not all have survived or been successful. Sometimes, I am told they take holidays… below,

                                                                                               

Clematis ‘ Belle of Woking’ reappearing after a two-year absence.  I thought I lost it.

REBLOOMING CLEMATIS

If you have been following this blog you know I have a passion for clematis. (see categories)

                    Clematis ‘Madame Edouard Andre’I was hoping some of my plants would re-bloom this autumn but such is not the case.  However, my friend Lyndy Broder has many and she was kind enough to send me some photos. BTW she grows well over 300 of them in her Georgia garden. (I’ll post her garden this coming spring..it is a real treat.) Meanwhile, these are blooming  in her garden NOW, in NOVEMBER!!!! (I love gardening in the south!)

                                                                     

Clematis ‘Reimans’, an Estonian hybrid, above, C. ‘Angelique’ below

                                                                     

                                                                 

Clematis ‘Solina’ blends beautifully with these asters…

                                                                    

Above, Clematis cirrhosa ‘Lansdowne Gem’  has nodding bell-shaped flowers and  evergreen foliage.

Whenever there is a question on Clematis I call Lyndy. She is on speed dial during pruning season,  putting down her secateurs to share her vast knowledge. And I do mean vast. She is on the Board of Directors of the International Clematis Society and contributes regularly to their website. Recently she wrote the section on Clematis for Allan Armitage’s book on Vines & climbers.

 To her credit, all this knowledge was aquired within the last 15 years when she developed an interest in Horticulture, AFTER she retired from a 9-5 !

                                        Clematis ‘Ville de Lyon’

All the above photos were taken by her brilliantly talented daughter MIA BRODER.