GARDEN TOUR ENGLAND & WALES

Its travel season again.  If my passport does not get here in time, I will  be homebound. I am consoling  myself with  photographs from trips past & exercising a mighty imagination!

with Tara Dillard (left) above, we enjoyed this perennial garden which we entered via. . .

this opened gate, (above) we found. . .

along this wall.

Look at the perfectly edged Vegetable garden below. Can this be real? No mulch, that means constant weeding & cultivating!

Look at these gardens below. The English are masters of the ‘mixed border’.

Notice how the repetition of tall plants gives the  border  below rhythm, while the one above is colour driven.                                                                     

Ancient yews,

some clipped into fantastical shapes,

elegant balustrading punctuated by a pot on every pier. . .                                                              and  the incomparable countryside …                                                                      There must always be time for tea.

and more gardens. . .

featuring hydrangeas!! I know I promised no more … but these  are not mine and I can’t help that others find them as appealing as I do.

© All photos & text 2010

MEANWHILE, back in the garden…

The hydrangeas are at their peak. This year they are particularly beautiful having benefitted from a long cold winter.

                                                                           

                                                                        Hydrangea macrophylla (unknown) on left & Hydrangea macrophylla ‘ Lilacina’    above

                                                                      Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’ is non-stop hose in hose flowers.

                                                                      

                                                                     

Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ on left and Hydrangea macrophylla ‘White Wave’  (above)

                                                                     

Hydrangea arborescens ‘Hayes Starburst’ a variation of the native  found by Hayes Jackson.

As a result of last weeks garden tour, I have added a pot to the Circle of Friends.

                                                                      

                                                                     

Much better.  Someplace for the eye to rest.

PORTRAITS:

                                                                     

 Above Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Jogasaki’  Below, Hydrangea serrata ‘ Beni Gaku’

                                                                      

The stunning  Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Geoffrey Chaudbund’

                                                                     

And the mysterious “From Penny’s back door” If anyone can ID this I would appreciate it.

© All photos and text 2010

MORE GREAT IDEAS

That Brilliant idea in my last post was that of Robert Meaders’, architect extraordinaire.  Also seen in his garden…

                                                                        

A welcoming collection of pots,

                                                                     

 an urn, perfectly placed in a border.

                                                                     

Another pot, that echoes the foliage of the hostas and the hydrangeas beyond.

                                                                      

Many other delightful & unique features  make this garden truly special.

Thank you Robert.

©All photos and text 2010

BRILLIANT IDEA!

Seen on the garden tour last weekend.

                                                                          

Between two windows, a blank brick wall is made into a sensational seating area.

                                                                     

 Not only does it overlook the garden, it reflects it!! Yes, that is a mirror. Brilliant!

© All photos & text 2010

GARDEN TOUR

Yesterday I ventured into Atlanta for one of the annual garden tours.

This year the majority of gardens were small  urban spaces, well-appointed  for outdoor living.

                                                                            

Above, a comfortable chaise in shade for reading and listening to the sound of the waterfall (below).

                                                                     

                                                              

Festoons of ivy grace an otherwise nondescript wall along a driveway.

                                                                       

Lushly planted window boxes.

                                                                     

And below, a private putting green!

                                                                     

I will share more highlights during the week.

FRAMING THE VIEW

Recently, Tara Dillard of A Garden View, posted  about frames in the landscape. It brought to mind a lovely vignette I saw in a garden while in England. Initially I thought an artist had set up to paint.

As I approached

                                                                       

I saw

                                                                        

What had been ‘Framed’.

 The lesson here is that framing a view brings it into relief.  Scroll back to the last photo, see the difference? See Tara’s post here.

©All photos & text 2010

TRANSITION SPACES

There are several types of transition spaces. The first would be the porch or veranda. Here the veranda unites both indoors and out, creating a continuous living space.

                                                                            

My veranda outfitted for a long hot summer of outdoor living. (above & below)

                                                                        

Below, the sweeping  lawn and the trees on either side anchor the house to the landscape, strengthening the relationship between architecture and site.

                                                                       Other transition spaces that create interest in the garden are pergolas, trellised walkways  or arbors.

                                                                     

Here one passes through a dark shaded area into a pool of sunlight.

                                                                       

                                                                       

The above arbor was created using only plants. No Money? No excuse!

© All photos & text 2010

GERTRUDE JEKYLL & GARDEN ROOMS

Probably one of the most influential garden designers of the early 20th century, Gertrude Jekyll, was a proponent of separating the garden into separate enclosed areas,  each devoted to a season, or a single plant.  She believed no garden could possibly be kept at it’s best for the entire season.

Below, her Autumn garden of Michaelmas Daisies. Painted by George Samuel Elgood.

Another view, painted by Helen Allingham.

Allingham also painted a break in the main flower border. Notice how Jekyll used masses of yuccas as  punctuation points on both sides of the path.

These watercolors illustrate her lush planting style and skillful use of color.